Lancaster

‘Technobiographies’ as a method of researching digital practices

The following is a post from my project-related page:

When did you first use a mouse? Send a text message? Search for something on the Web? Set up a social media profile?

What caused this first usage? Was it mere inquisitiveness? Or did you have to?

Can you remember the first [essay, email, and shopping list] that you wrote? How did you write it? Is it different to how you would do it now? What has changed over time?

The above are just a few of the many questions you could ask yourself (or someone else) as part of a technobiography, one of a number of methods we will adopt in the ‘Academics Writing’ project.

A technobiography is about researching your own practices with digital media, the phases of change over time, in different domains of your life, and how and why your habits of use emerged. Reflecting upon our use of digital media in our past and how we approached technologies can help us understand our use of new media today, and its anticipated future use. The use of technobios as a research method can add new dimensions to ethnographic exploration of digital literacy practices, especially when looking at ‘habits’ as opposed to ‘skills’ and how these are played out over time in people’s lives..

You can read the rest of the post on the Lancaster University project website:

‘Technobiographies’ as a method of researching digital practices

I have discussed another similar method of analysing one’s digital literacy practices in a previous post:

https://ibrarspace.net/2013/06/20/digital-literacies-icon-mapping-exercise/

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